Kennedy and Nixon: The Rivalry That Shaped Postwar America

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He served in the United States Peace Corps in Swaziland from to as a trade development adviser. Kennedy and Nixon. Christopher Matthews.

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John Kennedy and Richard Nixon shared a dream of being the great young leader of their age. Starting as congressmen in the class of , the two men developed a friendship and admiration for each other that would last for more than a decade. Christopher Matthews, the Washington bureau chief for the San Francisco Examiner and a former aide to Tip O'Neill, offers a fascinating look at the connections between the two most well-known politicians in the last 40 years.

He traces the symmetries of their beginnings--both were elected to the House of Representatives in and assigned to the same committee--as well as their similar thirst for power. While both men's rise and fall, events that had profound effects on America, have been well chronicled, Matthews' book is one of the few, if not only, that places the two in parallel historical context.

First as friends, then as bitter enemies, John Kennedy and Richard Nixon shared a rivalry that had a dramatic impact on American history and that has never been understood until now. One would become the most dashing figure of the post-World War II era, the other would live into his eighties, haunted and consumed by the rivalry.

In Kennedy and Nixon, Christopher Matthews offers a fresh and surprising look at these two political giants, offering a stunning portrait that will change the way we think about both of them. John Kennedy and Richard Nixon shared a dream of being the great young leader of their age. Starting as congressmen in the class of , the two men developed a friendship and admiration for each other that would last for more than a decade.

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But what drove history, Matthews shows, was the enmity between these two towering figures whose presidential contest would set the nation's bitter course for years to come. In this startling dual portrait - a modern-day Amadeus, with Nixon as the talented, frustrated, always outdone Salieri to Kennedy's Mozart, the charismatic genius - Matthews shows how the early fondness between the two men Kennedy told a trusted friend that if he didn't receive the Democratic nomination in , he would vote for Nixon degenerated into distrust and paranoia, the same emotions that, in the early 's, ravaged the nation.

Christopher Mattew's revealing book sheds new light on this complicated relationship and the role that it played in shaping America's history. Convert currency. Add to Basket. Book Description Free Press. Condition: New. Seller Inventory ZZN. More information about this seller Contact this seller. Book Description Free Press , Book Description Free Press, Content Protection.

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  • KENNEDY AND NIXON by Christopher Matthews | Kirkus Reviews.

Arthur to become a strong and effective president, a courageous anti-corruption reformer, and an early civil rights advocate. Despite his promising start as a young man, by his early fifties Chester A. Arthur was known as the crooked crony of New York machine boss Roscoe Conkling. For years Arthur had been perceived as unfit to govern, not only by critics and the vast majority of his fellow citizens but by his own conscience.

As President James A. Garfield struggled for his life, Arthur knew better than his detractors that he failed to meet the high standard a president must uphold. And yet, from the moment President Arthur took office, he proved to be not just honest but brave, going up against the very forces that had controlled him for decades. He surprised everyone--and gained many enemies--when he swept house and took on corruption, civil rights for blacks, and issues of land for Native Americans.

AMERICAN EXPERIENCE: JFK - The 1960 Election - PBS

A mysterious young woman deserves much of the credit for Arthur's remarkable transformation. Julia Sand, a bedridden New Yorker, wrote Arthur nearly two dozen letters urging him to put country over party, to find "the spark of true nobility" that lay within him. At a time when women were barred from political life, Sand's letters inspired Arthur to transcend his checkered past--and changed the course of American history.

This beautifully written biography tells the dramatic, untold story of a virtually forgotten American president. It is the tale of a machine politician and man-about-town in Gilded Age New York who stumbled into the highest office in the land, only to rediscover his better self when his nation needed him.

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Jean Edward Smith. George W. Bush, the forty-third president of the United States, almost singlehandedly decided to invade Iraq. It was possibly the worst foreign-policy decision ever made by a president. The consequences dominated the Bush Administration and still haunt us today. Bush drew on his deep religious conviction that important foreign-policy decisions were simply a matter of good versus evil. John Quincy Adams. Harlow Giles Unger. He fought for Washington, served with Lincoln, witnessed Bunker Hill, and sounded the clarion against slavery on the eve of the Civil War.

He negotiated an end to the War of , engineered the annexation of Florida, and won the Supreme Court decision that freed the African captives of The Amistad. He served his nation as minister to six countries, secretary of state, senator, congressman, and president.

John Quincy Adams was all of these things and more.